Breaking Away…

Yes everyone…it’s that time again…IU’s Little 500 is this weekend!  An event that sparked a hollywood movie and a legacy for Dave Blase…the most famous IU Little 500 rider who almost didn’t race!  Click here to read the Indy Star article about his story.

From the Indiana University Student Foundation page:

The Little 500 is the largest collegiate bike race in the United States. Modeled after the Indianapolis 500, riders compete in four-person teams around a quarter-mile cinder track at Bill Armstrong Stadium. The men’s race is 200 laps — 50 miles — and the women’s race is 100.

More than 25,000 fans flock to the campus in Bloomington, Indiana, each April to be a part of IU’s storied tradition. And who can blame them? The excitement, the competition, the pageantry — Little 500 is an experience like no other.

The race began in 1951 as a way to raise scholarship money for students working their way through college. Since that first race, IUSF has given away over $1 million to deserving undergrads.

Now about that Hollywood movie…do you remember it?  Dennis Christopher played Dave and Dennis Quaid, Jackie Earl Haley and Daniel Stern rounded out the 4 man team.  The synopsis is quite simple, Dave, nineteen, has just graduated high school, with his 3 friends, the comical Cyril, the warm hearted but short-tempered Moocher, and the athletic, spiteful but good-hearted Mike. Now, Dave enjoys racing bikes and hopes to race the Italians one day, and even takes up the Italian culture, much to his friends and parents annoyance. Meanwhile, the 4 friends try to break away from their townie, Indiana reputation while fighting with nearby college snobs.

I just love movies set in Indiana and about Indiana events…how about you?

breaking away

Vicki Reed

 

What do you think I do to earn my paycheck?

Think you know?  I know my friends understand that I’m busy A LOT, but reality is there is so much more to being a realtor than showing homes…this blog post by Andrew Fortune on his blog Great Colorado Homes puts it so perfectly, I wanted to share.  Click this link to read the post:  What Does a REALTOR® Do To Earn Their Commission?.

Now…want to become an Realtor?

What-Does-A-Realtor-Do-To-Earn-Their-Commission-3

Vicki Reed

Indy Drivers…it’s time to talk…

…when you are in a left turn lane…turn left!  Do not go straight and run the drivers going straight off the road!

…when you are turning right and there are 2 lanes of traffic turning left that have the light…don’t try to “beat” the first one coming at you!  It just ticks us off!

…when it is evening, but not quite dark, but there is no sun…turn your lights on!  Last night at about 4:30 on my way home, I needed to change lanes on a city street and thankfully caught a glimpse of a car to my right just before I would have pulled into him…dark gray day…dark gray car…no lights…really thankful I didn’t hit him!

…it snowed a bit last night, city streets weren’t horrible this morning, but they weren’t dry…drive accordingly.  Even the interstates weren’t in great shape, hence the huge backups around town.

…the “slow” or right lane on the city streets or the interstate is not the passing lane – if we are in that lane and driving the speed limit or slower if the road conditions warrant it, GET OFF MY A**!  Your lack of planning to have enough time to arrive at your destination is not my problem, but it could get you injured or killed if you don’t slow down!

…Emerson Avenue runs North/South through the city and from 10th street to Kessler is a 4 lane road…THE SPEED LIMIT IS 40 MPH and there are a couple of SCHOOL ZONES…please at least drive the speed limit and slow down for the school zones!

Rant over and “let’s be careful out there” everyone, remember, getting somewhere quickly is not worth your life!

Lets-Be-careful-Out-There

Vicki Reed

Common Sense

Saw this on Facebook the other day and as a farm girl, this advice reminded me of my Dad and my Pappa…and makes a whole lot of sense!

Advices from An Old Farmer
Your fences need to be horse-high, pig-tight and bull-strong.
Keep skunks and bankers at a distance.
Life is simpler when you plow around the stump.
A bumble bee is considerably faster than a John Deere tractor.
Words that soak into your ears are whispered… not yelled.
Meanness don’t jes’ happen overnight.
Forgive your enemies; it messes up their heads.
Do not corner something that you know is meaner than you.
It don’t take a very big person to carry a grudge.
You cannot unsay a cruel word.
Every path has a few puddles.
When you wallow with pigs, expect to get dirty.
The best sermons are lived, not preached.
Most of the stuff people worry about ain’t never gonna happen anyway.
Don’t judge folks by their relatives.
Remember that silence is sometimes the best answer.
Live a good, honorable life… Then when you get older and think back, you’ll enjoy it a second time.
Don ‘t interfere with somethin’ that ain’t bothering you none.
Timing has a lot to do with the outcome of a Rain dance.
If you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is stop diggin’.
Sometimes you get, and sometimes you get got.
The biggest troublemaker you’ll probably ever have to deal with, watches you from the mirror every mornin’.
Always drink upstream from the herd.
Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment.
Lettin’ the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier than puttin’ it back in.
If you get to thinkin’ you’re a person of some influence, try orderin’ somebody else’s dog around..
Live simply. Love generously. Care deeply. Speak kindly. Leave the rest to God.
Don’t pick a fight with an old man. If he is too old to fight, he’ll just kill you.
Most times, it just gets down to common sense.

Farm

Vicki Reed

22 Festive ways to Celebrate the Holiday’s in Indianapolis

I know I’ve posted about things to do during the Holiday’s in Indy, but here are a few more that look like a lot of fun!

The historic Lilly House — on the IMA grounds — will twinkle with holiday decorations inspired by the 1930s and 1940s. Amongst the trees, wreaths and greenery, visitors can see ornaments typical of Depression-era frugality and wartime shortages, as well as the exuberance of the post-war era.

2. Festival of Trees – Indiana History Center, 450 W. Ohio St., (317) 232-1882, indianahistory.org, Nov. 22 to Jan. 3.

The Indiana History Center’s annual holiday festival features an exhibition of historical photographs with a holiday theme. Visitors can also experience a winter wonderland of 25 holiday trees, decorated with themes such as “Home for the Holidays” and “Santa’s Workshop.” Other activities include holiday film screenings, kid-friendly crafts and adult painting classes.

3. Jingle Rails: The Great Western Adventure – Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, 500 W. Washington St., (317) 636-9378, eiteljorg.org, Nov. 22-Jan. 19.

Now in its fifth year, Jingle Rails is a wonderland of model trains, which chug along nearly 1,200 feet of track. They go through tunnels, over bridges and trestles, and past scale models of national landmarks, such as Mount Rushmore and the Grand Canyon. The display also includes local landmarks like Lucas Oil Stadium and Union Station — all decorated for the holidays. Still searching for that perfect holiday gift? Don’t miss the museum’s Winter Market (10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dec. 6), featuring handmade goods from more than 30 local artists.

4. Indianapolis Art Center: Pop-up Classes – IAC, 820 E. 67th St., (317) 255-2464, indplsartcenter.org/popups,  Ongoing

Choose from a variety of pop-up art classes, ranging from $20 to $60. Several focus on making glass ornaments, such as snowmen and glass balls. Others guide students through making holiday jewelry or crocheted wire snowflakes. Some classes are family-friendly, while others are perfect for a December date night.

 

During Jolly Days, the Children’s Museum transforms its staircase into a two-story slide, surrounded by festive holiday décor. Children can “ice skate” in the sock-skating rink and try indoor versions of winter activities like ice fishing. Come Nov. 28 to see Santa arrive in style — not in a sled, but in a race car. The museum also offers several opportunities to breakfast with Santa.

6. Celebration Crossing – Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., (317) 232-1637,indianamuseum.org,   Nov. 28-Dec. 31.

Santa and Mrs. Claus will arrive by helicopter Nov. 28 to open the Indiana State Museum’s annual holiday extravaganza. While children make crafts and ride the Santa Claus Express train, parents can explore re-created L.S. Ayres holiday window displays. Other activities include breakfast with Santa, tea parties in the historic L.S. Ayres Tea Room, and live music from local bands and choirs.

7. Christmas at the Zoo – Indianapolis Zoo, 1200 W. Washington St., (317) 630-2001,indianapoliszoo.com,   Nov. 28 to Jan. 4.

Back in 1967, the Indianapolis Zoo was the first zoo in the country to hold a holiday lights event, and it’s still going strong in its 47th year. Check out the vibrant holiday displays as you visit the animals — especially ones such seals, polar bears and red pandas that enjoy the cold weather. Visit Santa’s workshop in White River Gardens, enjoy carols performed by local school choirs, sample holiday refreshments, and go on a scavenger hunt for hidden mistletoe throughout the grounds.

8. Holiday Adventures at Conner Prairie – Conner Prairie, 13400 Allisonville Road, Fishers; (317) 776-6006;connerprairie.org, Nov. 28-Jan. 4.

Conner Prairie bustles with activity during the holiday season. Families can sign Holiday Adventures — a series of festive daytime activities and crafts in 1836 Prairietown. At night, return for Conner Prairie by Candlelight. The family-friendly Prairietown tour features costumed interpreters, who discuss the history of various holiday traditions. Amid the holiday hustle and bustle, it’s a peaceful, low-tech way to reconnect with the holiday spirit. Afterward, check out Gingerbread Village, featuring dozens of amateur and professional gingerbread creations.

9. Holiday Hullabaloo – Indianapolis Museum of Art, 4000 Michigan Road, (317) 923-1331,imamuseum.org,     5 to 9 p.m. Dec. 4.

The IMA will offer discounted shopping, as well as live music, free gift-wrapping and refreshments. Watch pottery demonstrations by artist Mary Firestone and preview the new collection from Patricia Locke Handmade Jewelry. Stop by the Jane H. Fortune Gallery to see Paul Gauguin’s “Christmas Night (The Blessing of the Oxen),” one of several artworks with a holiday theme.

 

Now in its 29th year at Hilbert Circle Theatre, “Yuletide Celebration” features traditions such as tap-dancing Santas and a reading of “Twas the Night before Christmas.” This year, kids will go crazy for tunes from Disney’s “Frozen,” such as “Let It Go” and “Do You Want to Build a Snowman?” The concert also includes a medley of holiday pop hits, such as Mariah Carey’s “All I Want for Christmas Is You.”

11. INDIEana Handicraft Exchange’s Holiday Mini – Harrison Center for the Arts, 1505 N. Delaware St.,indieanahandicraftexchange.com, 5-10 p.m. Dec. 5.

Your favorite summer craft fair is back for the holidays, featuring more than 45 vendors of handmade, artisan goods. Check out gift items from Boris Loved Natasha, 1337motif, Get Lathered Soap Company, Growler Girls and several jewelry artisans. You can also pick up gourmet goodies from vendors such as 240sweet, Chocolate for the Spirit, Newfangled Confections and Sage’s Simple Syrups.

12. Stutz Artists Association’s Holiday Open Studios and Exhibition – Stutz Business Center, 212 W. 10th St., (317) 292-3200, stutzartists.com, 5 to 10 p.m. Dec. 5

More than 25 Stutz artists will offer holiday gift items such as paintings, metal sculptures and jewelry. Also, check out the walls of the Raymond James Stutz Art Gallery, which will be decked out with artwork from more than 90 Stutz artists.

13. Tiny III: A Really Big Group Show – Gallery 924, 924 N. Pennsylvania St., (317) 631-3301, indyarts.org/gallery-924, Dec. 5 to Jan. 2.

Gallery 924’s third annual holiday show features hundreds of tiny artworks from dozens of Central Indiana artists. It’s an affordable way to start an art collection — or find a unique holiday gift. The show opens Dec. 5 in conjunction with the IDADA First Friday Art Tour.

14. Indiana Wind Symphony: “Holiday Dreams” – The Palladium at the Center for the Performing Arts, 1 Center Green, Carmel; (317) 843-3800; TheCenterPresents.org, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 6.

Join the Indiana Wind Symphony for its “Holiday Dreams” performance, featuring beloved tunes such as “It’s the Most Wonderful Time” and “White Christmas.” There’s a “Silent Night” sing-along, as well as classical selections from “The Nutcracker” and Handel’s “Messiah.” Tickets range from $5 to $40.

Other Palladium holiday events include the Carmel Symphony Orchestra’s “Holidays!” performance (Dec. 13) and the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir’s “Festival of Carols” (Dec. 20-21).

15. Rocky Ripple Holiday Bazaar – Rocky Ripple Town Hall, 930 W. 54th St., rockyripple.org, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 6.

Rocky Ripple’s 15th annual holiday festival benefits arts programs within the Rocky Ripple Parks Endowment Fund. The schedule includes live music, food vendors and a variety of local artist exhibitors, such as painters, sculptors, woodworkers and jewelry artisans.

16. Yelp’s Totally Bazaar – Indianapolis Central Public Library, 40 E. St. Clair St., (317) 275-4100,  yelp.com/events/Indianapolis-yelps-totally-bazaar-4, 6 to 10 p.m. Dec. 11.

This hip pop-up shopping party features more than 120 local vendors, including food artisans, jewelers, visual artists and vintage shops. Enjoy the live music or grab a snack from a nearby food truck, such as Spice Box or Scratchtruck. Beer and wine vendors include New Day Craft, Fountain Square Brewing Co., Sun King Brewing Co. and more.

17.Jordan College of the Arts: “Rejoice!” – Clowes Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., (317) 940-6444, cloweshall.org,   7:30 p.m. Dec. 12-13.

This annual concert features your favorite holiday music performed by student ensembles from Butler’s Jordan College of the Arts. If you’re seeing the university’s annual “Nutcracker” ballet performance at Clowes Hall, Dec. 4-7, this is a perfect follow-up to keep the holiday spirit alive.

18. “White Christmas” – The Palladium at the Center for the Performing Arts, 1 Center Green, Carmel; (317) 843-3800; TheCenterPresents.org, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Dec. 12.

As part of the Great American Songbook Film Series, the Palladium at the Center for the Performing Arts will screen “White Christmas.” The 1954 classic stars Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye and Rosemary Clooney. Admission is $10.

19. Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra: “Messiah” Sing-Along – Indiana Landmarks Center, 1201 Central Ave., (317) 940-9607, icomusic.org, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 13.

Several ensembles are performing Handel’s “Messiah” this holiday season, but only the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra offers a sing-along version. Conducted by maestro Kirk Trevor in his farewell season, the performance features four renowned vocal soloists — plus plenty of opportunities for audience participation.

For a more traditional version of Handel’s “Messiah,” pick up tickets to the ICO’s performance on Dec. 14, in conjunction with the Tabernacle Presbyterian Church Sanctuary Choir.

20. Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra: “Classical Christmas” – Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts of Butler University, 610 W. 46th St., (317) 639-4300, indianapolissymphony.org, 5:30 p.m. Dec. 13.

The ISO is known for its extravagant “Yuletide Celebration” (Dec. 5-23). But if you’re looking for a more intimate experience, check out “Classical Christmas.” The performance will be conducted by Raymond Leppard at the cozy Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts. Tickets are $45.

21.Indianapolis Children’s Choir: “Angels Sing” – St. Luke’s United Methodist Church, 100 W. 86th St., (317) 940-9640,icchoir.org, 7 p.m. Dec. 19 to 20.

You’ve probably seen a televised version of the Indianapolis Children’s Choir’s annual “Angels Sing” performance. This year, why not see the real thing? The concert features the ICC’s elite choirs, such as the Indianapolis Youth Chorale and Bel Canto. If you want to see the younger singers, check out the “Celebrate the Season” performance, 12:30 p.m. Dec. 20, also at St. Luke’s.

Indiana’s favorite a cappella ensemble, Straight No Chaser, returns to Indianapolis for four performances at Old National Centre — just in time for Christmas. Keep your fingers crossed for hilarious hits like “The 12 Days of Christmas” and “The Christmas Can-Can,” as well as more traditional holiday favorites.

So get out there and have some fun!

christmas

How Thanksgiving came to be a National Holiday…

I know, you believe that Thanksgiving came to be because of the Pilgrims and the Indians, however, President Abraham Lincoln set forth the Proclamation of Thanksgiving which set the precedent for America’s Thanksgiving.  The following is from the Abraham Lincoln online site:

Proclamation of Thanksgiving

This is the proclamation which set the precedent for America’s national day of Thanksgiving. During his administration, President Lincoln issued many orders similar to this. For example, on November 28, 1861, he ordered government departments closed for a local day of thanksgiving.

Sarah Josepha Hale, a 74-year-old magazine editor, wrote a letter to Lincoln on September 28, 1863, urging him to have the “day of our annual Thanksgiving made a National and fixed Union Festival.” She explained, “You may have observed that, for some years past, there has been an increasing interest felt in our land to have the Thanksgiving held on the same day, in all the States; it now needs National recognition and authoritive fixation, only, to become permanently, an American custom and institution.”

Prior to this, each state scheduled its own Thanksgiving holiday at different times, mainly in New England and other Northern states. President Lincoln responded to Mrs. Hale’s request immediately, unlike several of his predecessors, who ignored her petitions altogether. In her letter to Lincoln she mentioned that she had been advocating a national thanksgiving date for 15 years as the editor of Godey’s Lady’s Book. George Washington was the first president to proclaim a day of thanksgiving, issuing his request on October 3, 1789, exactly 74 years before Lincoln’s.

The document below sets apart the last Thursday of November “as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise.” According to an April 1, 1864, letter from John Nicolay, one of President Lincoln’s secretaries, this document was written by Secretary of State William Seward, and the original was in his handwriting. On October 3, 1863, fellow Cabinet member Gideon Welles recorded in his diary how he complimented Seward on his work. A year later the manuscript was sold to benefit Union troops.

Washington, D.C.
October 3, 1863

By the President of the United States of America.

A Proclamation.

The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God. In the midst of a civil war of unequaled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign States to invite and to provoke their aggression, peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere except in the theatre of military conflict; while that theatre has been greatly contracted by the advancing armies and navies of the Union. Needful diversions of wealth and of strength from the fields of peaceful industry to the national defence, have not arrested the plough, the shuttle or the ship; the axe has enlarged the borders of our settlements, and the mines, as well of iron and coal as of the precious metals, have yielded even more abundantly than heretofore. Population has steadily increased, notwithstanding the waste that has been made in the camp, the siege and the battle-field; and the country, rejoicing in the consiousness of augmented strength and vigor, is permitted to expect continuance of years with large increase of freedom. No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who, while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy. It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole American People. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquillity and Union.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington, this Third day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the Unites States the Eighty-eighth.

By the President: Abraham Lincoln

William H. Seward,
Secretary of State

So tell me…what are you thankful for?  Me?  Well…I’m thankful for

  1. having known my Grandparents – all 4 of them – as an adult,
  2. for my parents and the family values and work ethic they instilled in myself and my sisters. I couldn’t do what I do without their support, love and guidance,
  3. for my sisters…mostly for having their daughters…got me off the hook for providing grandchildren!
  4. for the “girls”…my 5 beautiful nieces and 1 great niece…they are the light of my life,
  5. THE GROUP…my insane, loving support system that I could not survive without,
  6. my friends,
  7. my Keller Williams family, I have found such a home with this group,
  8. my clients, without you I would be back in the corporate world and miserable, I’m so grateful for your trust in helping you sell and buy your homes and am so pleased that many of you are friends.

The list could go on, but this post is so long now that many will have stopped reading before the end…so let me just say…

images

 

Vicki Reed

 

Wow…just Wow…

Yes, as they say in the real estate industry, I drank the Keller Williams kool-aid.  While we are a fantastic company, with lots of great training and opportunities for mentorship and coaching, that’s not why I chose this company…no, the events of today just prove to me what an amazing company and group of people I work with and I couldn’t be prouder to be associated with them!

Today was our City Wide Thanksgiving luncheon, a giant pitch in for all our local offices and always a lot of fun.  During the luncheon, the orchestra from Hamilton Southeastern High School entertained and a representative for the St. Mary’s Child Center spoke about their mission and the needs of many of the children they serve.

For the last several years, our office has supported 2 children for Christmas, yesterday our MCA opened the wish to support 10 children this year…at $100 a child and then the most amazing thing happened…the agents from our office Keller Williams IndyMetro Northeast office started the challenge – real estate teams pledging money to support 1 child and it kept moving from there!  Wallets and checkbooks came out and by the time the lunch was over…35 kids are going to have Christmas, thanks to this amazing group of agents!  The money is still coming in and we look forward more money coming in before Wednesday next week!

To share even more about how this touched everyone in the room, the HSE orchestra gave the donation we had given them to entertain…to the cause!  What a great generous heart from the young people, recognizing what they can do for others.

Tell me…do you work with such generous people?  What are do doing to support those less fortunate than you this year?

thanksgiving

Vicki Reed

The Magic Bank Account

One of my friends posted this on Facebook this week and as we head into the holiday season, it serves as a reminder that no matter who we are we all have the same amount in our Magic Bank Account…

The Magic Bank Account
Imagine that you had won the following *PRIZE* in a contest: Each morning your bank would deposit $86,400 in your private account for your use. However, this prize has rules:
The set of rules:
1. Everything that you didn’t spend during each day would be taken away from you.
2. You may not simply transfer money into some other account.
3. You may only spend it.
4. Each morning upon awakening, the bank opens your account with another $86,400 for that day.
5. The bank can end the game without warning; at any time it can say,“Game Over!”. It can close the account and you will not receive a new one.
What would you personally do?
You would buy anything and everything you wanted right? Not only for yourself, but for all the people you love and care for. Even for people you don’t know, because you couldn’t possibly spend it all on yourself, right?
You would try to spend every penny, and use it all, because you knew it would be replenished in the morning, right?
ACTUALLY, This GAME is REAL …Shocked ??? YES!
Each of us is already a winner of this *PRIZE*. We just can’t seem to see it.
The PRIZE is *TIME*
1. Each morning we awaken to receive 86,400 seconds as a gift of life.
2. And when we go to sleep at night, any remaining time is Not credited to us.
3. What we haven’t used up that day is forever lost.
4. Yesterday is forever gone.
5. Each morning the account is refilled, but the bank can dissolve your account at any time WITHOUT WARNING…
SO, what will YOU do with your 86,400 seconds?
Those seconds are worth so much more than the same amount in dollars. Think about it and remember to enjoy every second of your life, because time races by so much quicker than you think.
So take care of yourself, be happy, love deeply and enjoy life!
Here’s wishing you a wonderful and beautiful day. Start “spending”….
And keep in touch with family & friends and all those you love.
“DON’T COMPLAIN ABOUT GROWING OLD…!”
SOME PEOPLE DON’T GET THE PRIVILEGE!

So remember…we all have the same amount in our Magic Bank Account…how will you spend yours?

time

Vicki Reed

Indianapolis Holiday Attractions

Yes, it’s that time of year again…what fun things can you find to do for the season?  This is from the Visit Indy website:

Christmas-at-the-zoo-2

Indianapolis is a city of tradition and the holiday season is no exception. Join 100,000 spectators on Monument Circle as we flip the switch on the Circle of Lights for the 52nd time. Or be a part of a new tradition and see the Simon Skjodt International Orangutan Center glowing in holiday colors for the very first time.
From old to new, here are few of our favorite holiday attractions and traditions.

Christmas at the Lilly House

Indianapolis Museum of Art, November 15 – January 4, 2015

Christmas at the Lilly House

Christmas at the Lilly House on the grounds of the Indianapolis Museum of Art uses the American country house setting to explore the decorative ideas of the 1930s and 1940s. Explore this piece of history and witness nearly a century of holiday tradition firsthand.


Jingle Rails

Eiteljorg Museum, November 22 – January 18, 2015

Jingle Rails

Jingle Rails at the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art is a journey to the Great American West – the real West and the West of the imagination. With over 1,200 feet of railroad, watch seven trains wind past the local treasures of downtown Indianapolis, including the Eiteljorg Museum, Monument Circle, Union Station, and Lucas Oil Stadium, as well as historical sites, including Mt. Rushmore, the Grand Canyon, Yosemite Falls, and Old Faithful.


Jolly Days Winter Wonderland

The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, November 22 – January 4, 2015

Jolly Days

Jolly Days Winter Wonderland is a holiday treat for the whole family at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. Complete with an indoor “ice skating” rink for children to skate in their socks, an ice fishing area, and a holiday train, this is an unbeatable family tradition. Mark you calendar – on November 29, Santa will arrive Indy style in a Dallara IndyCar!


Circle of Lights

Monument Circle, November 28 – January 11, 2015

Circle of Lights

Circle of Lights is the world’s largest Christmas tree, complete with nearly 5,000 lights and 52 garland strands streaming from Indy’s beloved 242-foot tall Soldiers and Sailors Monument. This tree has been named by Travelocity as one of the top five must-see Christmas trees in the nation.


Celebration Crossing

Indiana State Museum, November 28 – December 31

Celebration Crossing

Celebration Crossing at the Indiana State Museum invites you to learn about holiday traditions, both longstanding and new. Visitors can ride the Santa Claus Express, visit with Santa and get their photo taken, and participate in holiday- and winter-themed activities on all levels of the museum.


Christmas at the Zoo

Indianapolis Zoo, November 28 – January 4, 2015

Christmas at the Zoo

Christmas at the Zoo is a wintertime extravaganza everyone will enjoy. Stop by the Indianapolis Zoo for its annual light spectacular, and experience one of the nation’s top 10 zoos in a whole new way as hundreds of thousands of sparkling lights delight and inspire. Soaring 150 feet above the Skjodt International Orangutan Center, you’ll be able to spot the Beacon of Hope glowing in holiday colors from miles away.


Outdoor Holiday Adventure

Conner Prairie Interactive History Park, November 28 – January 4, 2015

Outdoor Holiday Adventure

Outdoor Holiday Adventure at Conner Prairie will take you on a winter adventure through Prairietown as you enjoy the holidays the 1830s way! Meet a variety of characters in their homes as they prepare for the holidays. Discover what holiday treats, games, and gifts were offered and even what pranks were played more than 175 years ago.

So what are

Follow-up on the home tour…

I positioned myself in the kitchen for the tour and I loved it when I heard people walk into my home and said “wow”!  It’s not fancy, but it is full of character, from the wood floors to the leaded glass french doors between my living room and dining room to the bedroom turned into a dressing room, it feels good when someone recognizes the love you put into your home.

Yes, some think it’s strange that I opened my home to strangers for a tour, but it is for a worthy cause as a fundraiser for the continued maintenance and care of The Benton House (click here to read more).

I cannot take any credit for the amazing renovations the gentlemen who owned the property before me did, it’s stunning, I didn’t even have to paint, just moved my things in, arranged them and hung pictures, but I think that my touches is what makes it feel like a home.  The decor is somewhat eclectic, a Lazy Boy camelback sofa, a roll-top desk that was my grandmothers, a wood and iron table in the dining room, antique dresser and gentlemen’s chest combined with a bit of animal print really make the dressing room interesting!  My bedroom is, by far, my favorite room in the house…dark chocolate walls, red curtains and bedding with cream accents and my big, cream comfy chair that all of my nieces (and my mom) hoped wouldn’t fit!

The attic is my office…taupe walls and generations of my family history detailed in black and white photos taking up nearly an entire wall, all watching me as I sit here working and hoping to make them proud.

So now I know what strangers think of my home…what would they say about yours?

Me in the kitchen

Vicki Reed